Be the Person You Would Want to Meet

Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatever a man sows, he shall also reap.

– Galatians 6:7

Being supremely analytical, this scripture can correlate to many things, but the primary principle that stands out to me is the simple fact that you shouldn’t ask for something you wouldn’t demand from yourself.

As a teen that tends to avoid unfortunate circumstances, or seems to have an overly average amount of intuition for his age, people tend to come to me for answers to their struggles and strifes. Sometimes the advice needed is not what is given, and sometimes I don’t have a definite answer for what they seem to be asking. Recently, this confounding moment happened to me, and it was difficult for me to cope with as I hate to not have answers to a question. The question was seemingly simple, very simple as a matter of fact. “Why do I put up with this?” they asked, and thinking intently about it for a period of time I came to the realization that there is a much deeper question inside. That question is simply what kind of person are you?

Most people feel the need for positive influences in their lives. People build and sculpt relationships and friendships based on the steep precipice of an idea that those friends inspire change in us good and bad; keeping the positive influences and removing the negative ones, but we neglect to ask ourselves if we are direct positive influences on ourselves? There’s a well renown quote that people know and repeat every day: ‘be the person you would want to meet.’ I couldn’t agree more. If we were to be the person we would want to meet, people like ourselves would gravitate towards us.

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A simple approach to this is to think intently about the traits you exhibit outwards towards others, good and bad. Then to interpret and understand those traits and comprehend which ones you possess as a reflection of your inside self. Do they match? Do you need to add or remove some to reflect your outward self? Realistically we all have something to change. Change is truthfully a never ending process as each little decision or obstacle to encounter molds us into who we are, but we alone hold the power to use it positively or negatively.

An authentic sense of ourselves is not inward, but outward. Love and compassion needs to flow out of us and not into us. We as humans need to exhibit as little selfishness as possible. We need to give as much as possible as ultimately ‘we reap what we sow.’ We not only need to look not only into our own interests, but also to the interests as others. The range in which we can seek out the interests in others is infinitely large, and if we give as much as we can give, listen as much as we can listen, and love as much we can love. It will be returned. It’s tremendous and fundamental; it’s just another one of those amiable traits worth it In the End.

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